Archive Page 2

Park City, Utah Wedding Photography – Erik and Amy – St.Mary’s Church – McPolin Farm – Swaner Preserve and Eco Center

13Sep13

Erik & Amy - Park City, Utah - St. Mary's Church - McPolin Farm - Swaner EcoCenter and Preserve

 

 

Erik and Amy were a super fun couple to shoot photos with a good crew of friends and family that made for shooting this multi-location wedding day fun and easy.  Three locations for this wedding shoot, St. Mary’s Church (St. Mary of the Assumption) was such a wonderful venue that shoots great with a lot of natural afternoon light and of course the iconic McPolin Farm for the wedding party photos and the Swaner Preserve and Eco Center for the reception.  I hope you like the photos!

Park City, Utah fall wedding – Jason and Claire

03Sep13

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Another wedding from a few years back that I neglected to post, Jason and Claire’s photos have been living on my hard drive (of course on theirs too) waiting for me to get bored enough to actually show people.  Surprisingly enough considering I spend most of my time behind the lens in a snowy mountain environment shooting skiing, this was the first wedding I’ve shot with snow around.  Also far from the norm for me, this wedding was a very small, intimate setting with a small group to match.  Shot in a house in Deer Valley that hosted a few scenes from the movie Dumb and Dumber with a stop at the iconic white barn between Park City and Kimball Junction for some photos of the bride and groom, the reception finished up at the Slopes Restaurant at the Waldorf Astoria at Canyons Resort.

Park City, Utah Wedding Photographer – Rory and Hannah – Canyons Resort and St. Mary’s Church

02Sep13

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So I’ve been a bit of a slacker posting wedding photos, so much so that three years later I’m finally posting Rory and Hannah’s wedding from September, 2010 at St. Mary’s Church with the reception at Canyons Resort in Park City, Utah.  Fall is quite the time to have a wedding in Park City with great fall foliage and great weather!

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Boise wedding photographer – Kris and Tara’s wedding – Barber Park

02Sep13


Photos from Kris and Tara’s wedding at Barber Park in Boise, Idaho.  This was a super fun wedding with a lot of friends around, which of course made the reception that much more fun with a real good party.

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The first run – published photos so far, Powder Magazine, Freeskier Magazine, The Wallisch Project

30Aug13

 


Tom Wallisch Scott Sports Poster

The first few issues of the magazines of the season are always a bit more of a treat to see your shots in print as it’s been eight to ten months since I’ve seen a fresh ski magazine come across the newsstands.

John Ware (Left) – Powder Magazine – September 2013 Shooting Gallery – Hartford, CT – w/Level 1 Productions

Tom Wallisch – Powder Magazine – September 2013 – P72 – The Wallisch Project

The Wallisch Project Cover Art

Sig Tveit – Freeskier Magazine – 2014 Buyer’s Guide – Sun Valley, Idaho – w/Level 1 Productions

Will Berman – Freeskier Magazine 2014 Buyer’s Guide – p77 – Slopestyle Ski Shop Ad – w/4Bi9 Media

Flyfishing trip on the Flathead River

04Apr13

Last fall I got the opportunity to hop into a quick fly fishing trip rafting down the North Fork of the Flathead River. I hadn’t really done much fishing, but been wanting to do a bit so I jumped on the chance to do a multi day trip on the river and of course take some photos. I was pretty spoiled on this one, as Jordan was a former guide with the Glacier Raft Company so this part of the river was all part of the old routine. I caught a bunch of Flathead dink’s, took way too many photos and had a awesome time. Thanks to the Glacier Raft Company and Hilary and Shane Hutcheson at Outside Media for hooking us up with gear for the ride!

Gearing up at the Glacier Raft Company
Gearing up at the Glacier Raft Company

Getting on the water at the Polebridge put in on the North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana
Getting on the water at the Polebridge put in on the North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana

Rigging up just down from the the Polebridge put in along the North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana with the mountains of Glacier National Park in the distance
Rigging up just down from the the Polebridge put in along the North Fork of the Flathead River, Montana with the mountains of Glacier National Park in the distance

Fitzpatrick Nobles casting from a raft on the North Fork of the Flathead River in Glacier National Park, Montana
Fitzpatrick Nobles casting from a raft on the North Fork of the Flathead River in Glacier National Park, Montana


Riding down the North Fork of the Flathead River in Glacier National Park, Montana


Jordan Haprer with the first of trout time on the Flathead

Headed back along shore to setup camp for the night.
Headed back along shore to setup camp for the night.

Fog filled sunrise at camp along the North Fork of the Flathead River
Fog filled sunrise at camp along the North Fork of the Flathead River

Jordan fueling the breakfast fire at camp.Jordan fueling the breakfast fire at camp.

Jordan rigging the boat for the last day's float down the river. Along with the gratuitous camera gear photo with my Clik Elite Contrejour 40 camera backpack loaded with my new BlackRapid Lens Bling labeled lens caps
Jordan rigging the boat for the last day’s float down the river. Along with the gratuitous camera gear photo with my Clik Elite Contrejour 40 camera backpack loaded with my new BlackRapid Lens Bling labeled lens caps.

Final day floating down the North Fork of the Flathead River to the pull out

Final day floating down the North Fork of the Flathead River to the pull out .

Fitz had a hard time starting the fire with traditional methods.
Fitz had a hard time starting the fire with traditional methods.


Last night on the river went a little deep into the Hamm’s


The last sunrise of our trip along the North Fork of the Flathead River , Montana


The smoky view on the way out of Glacier National Park from the North Fork Road along the Flathead River, Montana

Customs travel shortcuts for Americans – Nexus / Global Entry / TSA Pre

07Mar13

Wan to avoid this?

 

I’m going to start by qualifying this, I travel a lot, but not even close to as much as a lot of photographers I know.  I do travel enough though where I’m looking for every shortcut I can to make my life simpler when it’s time to hit the road or the airport.  As a photographer that tends to travel very heavy with lots of lighting equipment dealing with border crossings and airport security can sometime be a major hassle.  I’ve had a lot of situations where I’ve been detained to the point where I’ve missed my flight due to US Customs officers not really knowing their jobs, or just being assholes in general.  That being said, I have to be a red flag while travelling with 60lbs of camera/computer gear on my back, 40lbs of lighting/computer gear in my carry on roller, and 120-140lbs of lighting/ski gear and clothes in the remaining two bags.

There are a few things you can look at to make your life easier at airport security checkpoints.  One of which I’ve covered before with Customs screenings coming back into the USA which is US Customs form 4457.  Take a closer look here.  Walk into the customs office with your gear and get your gear registered.  This way no matter what they say, you are travelling with proof of ownership of your equipment in the case you are caused of buying gear abroad to bring back and sell without paying duties and taxes.  It’s happened to me before and it wasn’t fun, and I missed my flight because of it, and had to pay a large change fee to get on another flight after.  Going into the CBP (US Customs and Border Patrol) office to do this takes ten minutes (or more depending on how much gear you bring in) and you’ll never have to deal with it again as long as you own that equipment.  This is of course a lot more difficult to do if you don’t live near an airport with a CBP office, but if that’s the case, stop by next time you fly through an international airport in the USA.

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The second option is NEXUS and Global Entry.  These are programs with the CBP and DHS (Department of Homeland Security) that are “trusted traveler” programs that allow you very very quick and easy customs interviews and border crossings by land, sea or air.  Global Entry is the airport program that if you’ve flown into any of the major US airports during a busy time you’ve likely seen and have been super jealous of as you’ve stood in a line over an hour waiting to talk to a CBP agent, only to talk to another one about your baggage, and potentially be “interviewed” yet again about the $50k in equipment you may be traveling with.  Global Entry allows you to cut every customs line in the airport.  You know those forms you fill out with all the check boxes (US CBP Form I-94) and declare the items you’ve brought home with you from a foreign country?  Well, with Global Entry you don’t fill that out, you cut every line then go to a kiosk and check a couple of boxes on the screen, scan your passport, the kiosk takes a photo, you take a printout and go get your bags, hand your printout to a CBP agent (again where you cut every line) and walk out the door and leave the airport or hop on your connecting flight.  The last time I went through US Customs with Global Entry it saved me an hour and a half, cutting in front of at least 400 people.  Add to this that I didn’t have to deal with the hassle of getting the third degree about all my camera equipment.  This is pretty well the best thing travel related to me that I’ve found since I started travelling internationally.

So, what do you have to do to get this privilege of easy US Customs entry?  You pay a $100 fee that is good for five years, they do a background check on you (no felonies) and you have to go into a CBP office that’s part of the Global Entry Program (basically every major US international airport) to be interviewed and fingerprinted.  The interview is more of a formality at that point as it’s mainly for fingerprinting and to verify your identity.  The only difficult thing about that is that the interviews are scheduled and when I scheduled my interview, most airports were booked out at least 1-3 months, if not longer.  So if you do not live in a city with one of these CBP offices it can be a bit more difficult.  However that being said I missed my interview time due to a late flight (I scheduled my interview during a layover in LAX) and when I showed up there was nobody waiting to be interviewed even though there were five more interviews scheduled after the one I was late for.  I bring this up because after seeing that, I wouldn’t be guess that after your online application has been approved and you schedule an interview, you could just show up to one of those airports outside of your scheduled interview and just wait for an opening and get that out of the way unscheduled.  Don’t quote me on that but from what I saw, I’d bet that it would work.  The other part of awesome that Global Entry gets you is TSA Pre.  Now while on paper it seems to be pretty meaningless it can be pretty nice.  TSA Pre is a third line in airport security that cuts all the lines, even the first class / medallion member line which even that can sometimes be big at major hub airports.  The extra part that is pretty minimal is that you don’t have to take your laptop out of your bag, or your shoes or belt off.  Pretty minor however I’ve noticed I get a secondary search on my camera bag a lot less.  Again most of this is pretty meaningless unless of course you arrive at the airport 30 minutes before your flight to another country.  One other note for the Global Entry program, if you are an American Express Delta Reserve, Platinum or American Express Platinum card holder, part of your benefit is you will be credited for the $100 global entry application fee.

nexus_20logoThe third is one I hadn’t really paid attention to since I haven’t done much travel over the road to Canada recently is the NEXUS program.  This program works in the same way as the Global Entry program does at the airport for the most part only it’s been put in place for border crossings to and from Canada and Mexico.  The difference with the NEXUS program is that they actually do a more extensive background check where even traffic tickets can get you kicked off the program.  I’m sure you’ve been in the same long border crossing lines going to/from Canada before if you shoot skiing or snowboarding and know cutting those lines could save you hours if it delays you to the point where you are say, stuck in Vancouver rush hour traffic on your way to Whistler.  Since I’ve also dealt with having my entire car searched and being interrogated about ownership of my car like I was hiding terrorists in my spare tire compartment in my trunk I’d also reccommend it, especially if you cross the border a few times a year, and especially for your filmmakers that are always sketched out about being turned away at the border.  If you have neither yet then it would be the best if you signed up for the NEXUS program instead of Global Entry.  I say this because the NEXUS program also gives you Global Entry and TSA Pre access, and it’s only $50 instead of the $100  for Global Entry.  You still have to do an interview and be fingerprinted but for NEXUS you only have to do this once and you get all of the programs.  If you are a Global Entry member, you still have to go in for another interview to be a part of the NEXUS program as well.  You can use your Global Entry card to use the NEXUS lines entering the USA from Canada, but not the other way around, to enter Canada, so getting a NEXUS card would be the way to go as you get access to all the programs.

I hope that wasn’t too confusing.  If you haven’t checked the links within this post I’ve added them below to get directly to where to read up and apply for these programs.

Happy Travels!

– More information about NEXUS on the CBP website

More information about the Global Entry program

TSA Pre program

– Apply for NEXUS, Global Entry here: Global Online Enrollment System (GOES)

Freeskiing Magazine (Japan) Cover

07Feb13

Freeskiing Magazine (Japan) Cover - Mike HornbeckSometimes I get the photo how I want pretty quickly, and sometimes, like this time it took a second trip, and a few more hours before I was able to figure out how to light this one.   To add to this, it took two days, a new motor, and a ton of frustration until we were able to get the winch cranking fast enough to allow the skiers to get the tricks they wanted.  There’s always that first jib feature of the trip that gets me shaking my head, thinking “you fuckers are crazy.”  Well, this was it.  Mike Hornbeck, sliding up, around and back down on this ledge was pretty nuts.  I don’t always get to shoot near sunset but fortunately on January 3rd in Anchorage, Alaska, we had about an hour and a half of this kind of sky, which is pretty damn awesome when you’re trying to get just the right shot, on such a difficult feature for the skiers to get.

The Photo Annuals – 2013

10Jan13

Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - Page 116 - Niklas Ericsson at Sun Valley Resort, Idaho - Level 1 Productions
Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – Page 116 – Niklas Ericsson at Sun Valley Resort, Idaho – Level 1 Productions

This is the time of year when I get really excited, then really disappointed at the same time.  The photo annuals carry some of the best images of the year and every year my anticipation for what I could have in these issues grows as things get closer.  I see my shots, I don’t see shots I hoped I’d have in there, and then there’s everyone else’s work, typically from Mattias Fredriksson, Jordan Manley, Blake Jorgenson, Nate Abbott, Bryn Hughes, Christian PondellaAlex O’Brien, Adam Clark, Grant Gunderson, Steve LloydTero Repo, and with the new blood with guys like Darcy Bacha, Garrett Grove and Jim Harris.  I see everyone else’s shots thinking how the hell did they pull that off, why the hell did I never think of that, those crazy bastards, or the one that gets me the most, I tried that, and I couldn’t pull it off.  Regardless of seeing others pull off what I couldn’t figure out I’m always stoked to see great work, shots that make me think about how they pulled it off, where they had to go to get the shots, and of course the ones that drive me to try and come up with new ideas as well.  This year’s images in the Photo Annuals were the same in those ways, but this season was especially a great collection of images as Powder Magazine’s photo annual was simply massive.  Seeing all that great work in one place, it’s pretty rad and I’m glad to be a part of it.

Below are my images in the Photo Annual’s of both Powder and Freeskier Magazines.  Thanks for looking!

 Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p89 - Tom Wallisch sliding a c-rail in Anchorage, Alaska - Level 1 Productions
Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p89 – Tom Wallisch sliding a c-rail in Anchorage, Alaska – Level 1 Productions

Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p104 - Sig Tveit at Sun Valley Resort, Idaho - Level 1 Productions
Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p104 – Sig Tveit at Sun Valley Resort, Idaho – Level 1 Productions

Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p106 - Cam Riley hiking a stair set in Spokane,Washington - Poor Boyz Productions
Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p106 – Cam Riley hiking a stair set in Spokane,Washington – Poor Boyz Productions

 

Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p148 - Random Joey walking around the streets of Helena, Montana, with a helmet on.
Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p148 – Random Joey walking around the streets of Helena, Montana, with a helmet on.

Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p164 - Steve Stepp Voice profile

Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p166- Steve Stepp Voice profile
Powder Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p166- Steve Stepp Voice profile

Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p8 - Niklas Ericsson at Sun Valley Resort, Idaho - Level 1 Productions
Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p8 – Niklas Ericsson at Sun Valley Resort, Idaho – Level 1 Productions

Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p68-69 - Tom Wallisch disastering a flat down ledge in Anchorage, Alaska - Level 1 Productions
Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p68-69 – Tom Wallisch disastering a flat down ledge in Anchorage, Alaska – Level 1 Productions

Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p81 - Logan Imlach pulling the guts out of his winch trying to get her to behave - Level 1 Productions
Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p81 (right) – Logan Imlach pulling the guts out of his winch trying to get her to behave – Level 1 Productions

Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual - p86 - Bobby Brown gapping the half pipe step up feature in Breckenridge, Colorado - Level 1 Productions
Freeskier Magazine 2013 Photo Annual – p86 – Bobby Brown gapping the half pipe step up feature in Breckenridge, Colorado – Level 1 Productions

 

 

Don’t tag them make them buy the whole cow!

31Dec12

This is a rant that I’ve thought about more times than I’d like to consider and I’ve been meaning to write this, but it’s just been too daunting of a task. Fortunately, I’m sitting at an airport with absolutely nothing else to do so I’m going to take a crack at it.

Social media and social marketing is a subject that’s new to most of us in general, then add it to the world of action sports photographers and the pile of what to do’s is very uncertain. Most of us are not marketing people, most of us are not business people. We are creative people which usually translates into very un-creative when it comes to marketing ourselves in the growing, changing, and completely un-defined realm of growing our following on the internet. Our goals these days are mostly getting our work more exposure, and hopefully the right exposure to the creative directors, photo editors or maybe even just the popular blogger that can amplify our audience to the scope that we couldn’t even imagine. All, potentially changing our audience in a 24 hour viral period. Unfortunately, it’s not an easy task that we are far from trained for.

What seems to be happening, is really what I see as the wrong way of doing things. It’s throwing a turbo charger on the race to the bottom that seems to be happening in our business. We started off by doing the opposite of what we should have with internet image licensing. Our pricing was set low, way low below the bar. Internet traffic has exponentially grown, giving our images on the web higher circulation that could ever have been seen in print, yet the pricing has been set to about 20% of the pricing that would be charged for licensing with similar print circulation. While it’s going to be a daunting task for most of us to be able to change this black hole of internet pricing, there are things happening now that there’s still time to do something about.

There’s a current trend in social media among photographers, specifically among action sports photographers that we need to think about. We need to think about it a lot before the next time you do it. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are the avenues driving this trend that really, has to stop. The trend that’s beginning is simply tagging companies in your photos, shared in your social media. I’m sure most of the young photographers are thinking this is an quick and easy way to get your photos in front of the athletes, the gear manufactures, photo editors, basically anyone of influence that needs to see your photos to get the useful exposure you are looking for right? Sure, it is. However this is telling your potential paying clients one simple thing, you don’t need them to pay you for your photos to be used in their social networking and social marketing programs.  If you are taking your hard earned photos, that cost you a lot of time, and also money to create, then posting them on Facebook, well that’s fine. If they don’t get purchased then why not get them out there for people to see right? The problem begins when you start tagging these photos with the athlete’s sponsors, the resort it was taken at, etc in the context of the ski and snowboard industry. The same concept can be applied to any other market really.

If you tag these companies, what happens is simple. Your photos end up in their Facebook page’s feed, in their photo galleries. You wouldn’t just give Company A these photos for free if they asked you for them, with absolutely zero payment or compensation of any sort would you? If the answer is yes, then I guess you like paying your own money, spending your own valuable time to work for Company A. Let me repeat that. You are basically paying Company A to do a job they should be paying YOU for. If you don’t see the problem in this look at it this way. Would you pay your mechanic $500 so you could do the work to fix your own car instead of them? I hope not, cause that would be you’d be pretty broke if you operated that way. If you are tagging Company A in every photo you post on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram then you are telling your Company A and any other potential clients that they do not have to pay you for social marketing photography.

In case you haven’t noticed there are numerous companies these days that are no longer doing print advertising campaigns. Lots are doing web only direct marketing campaigns but also putting a lot of resources into social media. Think about how this is going to effect your ability to stay in business if this trend continues, print dries up and you are still just tagging away. We need to adapt and effectively market ourselves and our own work without just giving every company a free ride.

Have I tagged Company A in my photos I’ve shared on my Facebook Fan Page? Of course I have. The difference in what I’m talking about vs how I’m doing it is I’m adding tags when the photos have come as a result of an ad purchased, from a day shoot I did for Company A, or maybe even some sort of cross marketing campaign I was somehow involved with. I am however not just giving those up for free. Those have been paid for and are simply an added value for both myself and Company A. I certainly am not saying I know what to do in the way of self-promotion and successful social networking and marketing for my photography business. If I did, I’d be a big deal, have tons of money and certainly have more Twitter followers (some of which are following me, simply because my last name is SEO, a acronym for Search Engine Optimization). I wish I had those answers. What I think I have is an idea of how this trend can effect your bottom line, and how it can put us in the race to the bottom.

I’m hoping this can start a bit of discussion on the matter. Please if you do have something to say, comment on this, don’t hold back. It’s an important thing to discuss.




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